Blog Archives

Masonville, Colorado- A Kate’s 8 town

MasonvilleColorado~ a beautiful, picturesque little (un-incorporated) micro sized, 20140626_133444unincorporated town (wide spot in the road)  has all eight of the assets that every community shares. The fact that there really in no ‘town’ per-se, is not a problem.  A skip away from Estes Park, Loveland and Ft Collins– it is still a slice of the wild west and feels like it is miles and miles from anywhere. (which it kinda is- ank8s average of 30 miles to ‘anywhere’)

Masonville easily covers all the assets:  Architecture, Art/Culture, Cuisine, Customs, Commerce, Geography, History and People.

Every things fits into one of these categories, and every town- even a ghost town- has a story to tell about each one” – Kansas Sample Foundation

Here’s my ‘story’ on each element;

Geography– Masonville was originally platted in the Buckhorn Canyon following a  small discovery of Gold.  It is surrounded by the stunning foothills and rolling meadows leading up to Estes Park and the Buckhorn, Redstone and Big Thompson creeks. It is an area considered to be part of the beginning of the “Front Range”.  Gold, Silver, Tungsten, Copper and Nickel have been found there along with a host of other lesser ores and small gemstones.

The winding roads leading into Masonville make it a popular destination for motorcyclists and bicyclists alike.

20140626_133558Art/Culture  A part of Masonville holds a mini western ‘town’ and many sculptures and 20140626_134359paintings.  In part they tell a story about the West that Was and in part just for whimsy.

Commerce  For a town with only TWO businesses, it sure is a busy place!!! The  Masonville Mercantile  is an incredible little year round Emporium that serves many markets- everything from unique gifts to the wedding and historical re-enactment markets. Their milliner even

derby hats

photo by M. Vendegna

makes award winning hats for the ladies at the Kentucky Derby.  The Nostalgic West Leather Shop is a ‘go to’ shopping hot spot for all things leather. Dusters, cowboy hats, quality bike leathers (we have some from there!) gloves, gifts and accessories.

 

Cuisine – While there are no traditional food places to eat at in Masonville,  each year there are a number of events from farmers markets to BBQ’s that draw huge crowds. – A great way to meet new people and enjoy the beauty of the area. (and there’s always the snacks at the Mercantile!)

People – Many of the local residents of the Masonville area have roots that run very deep.  Members of the Milnor family has been in the area since the late 1800s. bikes masonville

Each year tourists from all over the world visit Masonville too. I have met people from England, Scotland and Australia while hanging out in Masonville!

Architecture – The Mercantile and the Hotel (now privately owned) were originally built closer to Buckhorn creek, but later moved to where they currently are. The store has been added onto over the years. But the authenticity of the wild west remains. Across from the store, is a small outdoor chapel and ‘wild west town’. Much of it was built with reclaimed lumber from original buildings to the area.   Read here for some history on the Masonville store.  Down the street, the old school is still there and has been turned into a private residence, as has the hotel.

History- Named for James R Mason, Masonville itself  was originally platted in the 1890’s, masonville-school3though there were already families living in the area at that time.  The Kitchens, Milner’s and Sheldon’s to name but a few. – The local history is rich with stories of cattle rustlers and mountain men, pioneers and tourists.  And the life story of Cal Carter, Masonville’s last goldcal-carter-mine1 miner is quite extraordinary.

Customs- Where to start?? Many years ago the mercantile hosted the Masonville Mercantile Ball at the holidays.  I am not sure if they still do, as we have been gone from the area a few years now and I have only been back in the summers.

But I do know that Masonville plays host to a number of Steam Punk, Wedding, SASS, bike runs, Sunday-go-to-meeting, BBQs, Farmers markets and more.

These are a continuance of the customs from olden days when people congregated at the local store for fellowship, to hear the news and get entertainment.

Stay tuned for more Kate’s 8 towns!

~Katy~

Katy is a speaker for  rural and small communities and small business as well as a columnist for AgWeek.   www.taitandkate.com for more information

 

Advertisements

Roadside kitch- It gets me everytime

What can I say- I like cheese. The cheesier, the better. I am a sucker for it every time.  Especially the ones that you have your head in the picture.   Leaping tall fences, cutting off traffic, abruptly stopping the car… I am guilty of all.

20140626_133703_3

Masonville, CO

Thankfully my sons were always game for another stop on our adventures.

20151114_180727

Terry Bison Ranch, WYO

 

I think my love of Roadside Kitch began in the early ’70s with a long trip to the east coast and my first sighting of an oversized Bobs BigBoy! Or maybe it was Burma Shave that grabbed me  with their signs…”The monkey took one look at Jim and threw the peanut back at him“(Dixon, CA)

Roadside attractions became wildly popular all over the US in the 1930s when we began to “See the USA in our Chevrolets” and continued well into the 60s. – They were to grab your attention and get you off the road and into town.

dinosaur-murdo

Man walking Dinosaur   Murdo,SD

The general intent was that if they got you to stop to see the worlds biggest ball of twine, then you’d probably stay for dinner, get gas  (think “eat at Stuckey’s and get gas”) and maybe even stay the night or do a little shopping.

 

The idea is still the same today, except most roadside attractions are now in predominately rural areas.

img_20160512_151223965 20151113_110433_lls

And I still stop at them. I doubt I will ever be too old to enjoy the novelty of roadside attractions.

~Katy~

 

SaveYour.Town

~life, love and humor on the farm

Paula.Jensen

Creating passion for community leadership and development

Grotto on the Go

Big Adventure ~ Tiny Space

daisiesandbluebellsblog

we are an online Children's Boutique selling funky, vintage style and retro kids clothes

A Girl & Her Chickens

A dive into all things feathered and farming...

Daily Hike

Just the daily things...

knotty is nice

Loving the knotty pine in our vintage homes

Kate's Country Living

~life, love and humor on the farm

The Misters Mrs

A Southern Fried Housewife