Blog Archives

Missy the Wonderdog

 

Many of you have followed Missy the Wonderdog‘s adventures on FB for over a decade.

Cow dog, business dog, chicken herder extraordinaire, teacher, companion, playmate,

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Surveying her domain

garden guard, doorstop, protector.

(she is also the reason Big Papa’s favorite truck sounds like being in a wind tunnel)

Missy was our rescue pup. She was actually being born as her mama was being rescued from a puppy mill that had gotten out of hand.

Big Papa said NO DOGS IN THE HOUSE.

Period. Ever.

And then she turned those great big brown eyes on him and it became “Only in the mud room.”  Pretty soon she had commandeered a spot by the wood burner and Big Papa would play dolly with her.  When spring came, she was given a deluxe dog house outside complete with mobile fur coats (cats) to keep her warm on cool days.

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Snitching from the calves

Missy was supposed to be a cattle dog.  And she was… She would drink from bottles just like the calves, she would eat hay and grain just like the big Girlz, slept in the roundy-rounds with calves,  she played with  all the cows and followed them everywhere.  She even swam from time to time in the watering trough. Missy could help herd the cows. Right up until a gate or barn door was open. And then she would go sit in the opening, barring them from entrance!

So- technically she was a cattle-dog. Just not the way Big Papa wanted.

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Missy the Wonderdog and Sis ‘herding’ the cows

Eventually Missy learned to ride the 4-wheeler to better chase her Girlz and bring them treats. She loved the wind in her hair!

Missy also became the unofficial spokes-dog for ShopSmallSaturday championing small

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small biz champion

businesses everywhere.

Now- back to the Not-in-the-house thing….. Missy was a smart girl. She knew exactly when Big Papa left the yard. And as soon as his truck cleared the tree row, she would be at the door.  I am a sucker for a cute face, so I would let her in.

And on the days she was in the house I would sweep and mop to hide the evidence. Bless the day my mother-in-law called and told me to get a Swiffer!! So much faster and easier!!  Thankfully I was also starting get grey hairs about this time, so sometimes Big Papa would spy some fur I overlooked and I would say “Ohhhh! Must have been mine!”

Mostly I liked having her IN the house on the nights Big Papa worked away from the farm. She always made me feel safe.

One time, Big Papa came back home shortly after leaving… as he was parking I was literally dragging Missy the Wonderdog out the other door! Almost busted!!

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Big Papa

Missy wasn’t supposed to ride in the car either. There may or may not have been an incident with Lilly the Lab and his favorite pickup years before that made him forever bar me from doggie rides in the car.

Eventually though, Missy won and commandeered a spot in the old farm truck and would help me drive from field to field.

Missy the Wonderdog became part of the family.  A constant companion, always happy to just sit nearby and offer us wags and smiles.

Over the years the kidd-o’s accused me of treating her better than I treated them.  (SHE never talked back or held her hand out and was always happy)

This year Missy slowed down. We’d go for walks and she’d stop and rest. I thought it was

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Never without a dolly

because she was a little on the fluffy side after retiring from full time cow and chicken herding. As it turned out, she had the cancer.

For love of us, Missy the Wonderdog concealed her pain and discomfort for a long time.

The decision to let her cross the rainbow bridge was a heart wrenching one. It was decided that we would let her be until she was no longer able to be a dog but before she couldn’t do her job anymore.  Missy kept her Doggie Dignity. As long as she was still walking out to the coop for a daily chicken head count (we no longer had cattle at this point) all was good.  One day, she looked at me and let me know in her own way that it was time. 

We had made arrangements with our vet to come to the house to help Missy cross the Rainbow Bridge painlessly and in comfort, surrounded by her friends (cats and chickens) and family (Big Papa and I ).  Holding on to her Dolly and snuggled on her favorite blankie with us petting and crooning to her, she slipped away to a better place.

We know without a shadow of doubt that D’art, Mosely, Lilly-puttin, Bambii the Amazing Albino Elk and her favorite Girlz -Barbie and Rusty were waiting to walk her across.

I was working in the garden the next afternoon (-one of her favorite places to hang out in the summer) feeling incredibly sorry myself, when I heard a very faint, muffled barking. I knew in that instance Missy the Wonderdog was letting me know she arrived safely on the other side and is still watching over me from afar.

“And when my time on earth is done, missy11
And at heaven’s gate I’m near,
I don’t want any harps or horns,
Just … happy barks to hear.”

~Katy~

 

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Missy as a pup

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Gone farmin’

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Suicide in a small town

  What do you do when someone you know is suicidal and the response you get from local healthcare is It’s a small town-we don’t want to get involved if we don’t have to”?

Ok- I KNOW this is controversial. I also know that many will say “It can’t happen here“. Or worse “Why did you interfere?”  I am also aware that by sharing my thoughts on this, I may be blackballing myself for life from Hubbs hometown.

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“Joanie” and I 

No- I will not name places or proper names.

But you know what? If nobody talks about it, nothing changes!

When we moved to the country, I became friends with ‘Joanie’ (henceforth my friend will be “Joanie”) and later business partners for a while.  I always knew she was diabetic and had anxiety, but a  person who didn’t know her would never have guessed.

A number of years ago Joanie had some of her medications changed. In a matter of weeks she had lost a ton of weight and couldn’t focus on tasks for very long. Even more concerning was her hallucinations- She had begun believing she had just delivered twins and was  some very crazy thoughts about her hubby. She even offered to let me babysit!

I figured she would go for a follow up and her Doctor would notice something was off.

Another week goes by and Joanie is giving away things and saying “It won’t matter at the end of the week” and “I don’t need  it where I’m going”.

Ding! Ding! Ding! Warning Bells are going off.

I tried talking to her about it, but she quite obviously thought nothing was amiss. Her husband was indifferent to it all- (Theirs wasn’t exactly a stellar relationship)

So I did the next best thing, or so I thought. I called the local clinic. That’s where most of us who live out in the country go for routine bloodwork and stuff. I spoke to the head nurse, who also knew Joanie personally. I told her what I suspected and the response was

“We really don’t want to get involved if we don’t have too. We still have to live here.”

WHAT?????? Was she joking??

Nope- she really meant it. She was uncomfortable getting involved because of it turned out to be a false alarm, she would be very uncomfortable around town. This nurse also asked me if I had tried talking to her husband. Yep.

I explained that she had recently had some medications changed.. I even offered a solution- Couldn’t she call up Joanie and say something like “Gee, we dropped your last vile of blood, can you pop by real quick and let us take some more?”  My thoughts were if they could get her in there, they could evaluate her kinda on the sly.

Nope.

But she did offer to send their secretary down to Joanies work to observe her.   To which I (probably snarkily) replied along the lines that plenty of people finish the days work just fine before jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge.

I called back that afternoon, and was told that they didn’t have time for this and that she looked fine.  In no uncertain terms I let it be known that if something happened to my friend, that I would be shouting it from the roof tops and naming names.

Obviously things were not fine. 

The next day Joanie said it would ‘all be done by Friday’ and she was ‘only sorry to be leaving her (make-believe) babies behind’.  Only a couple days away.

So I took drastic  and probably unethical measures- I telephoned my personal Doctor and asked if I gave a name could she please look up that persons physician and pass the information along. I also shared my futile attempts in a small town to get her help.

Now- I knew full well at the time that there’s is DR/Patient confidentiality… But I was hoping my doctor would try anyway.

And my Doctor did.

Joanie’s doctor made some excuse to get her in… just in a nick of time it seems.  It was indeed the change in medications was causing her to lose weight and think irrationally. Joanie ended up in therapy for a bit, but eventually found her way back.

Me? Well- I was immediately taken to task by locals for ‘Sticking my nose where it didn’t belong’ and “Didn’t I know how much TROUBLE the clinic was in now???”

Like I gave a shit.  Suicide is rising in rural areas. There is always talk about speaking up if you think someone is suicidal.

Given what happened in this small town, I think there are many that won’t speak up because they have to live here. This has bothered me for years. We need to change that part of Small Town Mentality.  “Because we live here” is the perfect reason WHY we should speak up.

Personally I didn’t give a rip what anyone thought. Joanie’s life was more important than me being black listed.

Which I was. For YEARS.

-Katy-

 

 

 

 

For love of country

 

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SSG Harry Moroncelli

This week I was invited to the French Foreign Legion Medal Ceremony for  six US Veterans in Windsor, Colorado.

Let me tell you, it was one of the most profoundly moving moments I have ever been a part of.

LT Leila Morrison, LT Armand Sedgeley, 2LT William (Bill) Powell, SSG Philip Daily, SSG Harry Moroncelli and  (posthumously) CPT Joseph Grahm  were awarded the Knight -or Chevalier- medal for their outstanding service and dedication during WW2.

After the bagpipes and the colors were presented, both National Anthems were played. No words to the music, but it was quickly apparent which veterans in the audience had served in France as they all saluted the flag and sung the anthem in French.  When the Star Spangled Banner began playing, it started as a few bars hummed and them IMG_5357everyone sang with passion. There were tears rolling down cheeks- it was that emotional.

While I was observing the people around me, the line from that Abba song flashed through my head “I can see it in your eyes- how proud you were to fight for freedom in this land”.

Each and everyone of the medal recipients was extremely humble and truly don’t think they did anything that anyone else wouldn’t have done.

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LT Leila Morrison

Solely by chance I had met Leila a few weeks prior to this.  What a story! Leila graduated nursing school at 22 and immediately joined the Army as a nurse and was sent to field hospitals on the front lines. She was at both Normandy and Battle of the Bulge caring for our wounded warriors. After that she was on hand at the liberation of Buchenwald concentration camp. After that she was returned stateside and married her sweetheart when the war was over.

OH! The questions I wanted to ask! Don’t get me wrong, I loved that she shared parts of her story with me, but there was so much more I wanted to know! It simply wasn’t the place to go asking a zillion questions.

The room was packed with friends and family and many, many local servicemen from all branches. LTC Huffman gave background on the recipients and really brought the stories to life with photos and antidotes. The Hon Christophe Lemoine from the French Consulate gave a very moving speech that also had people wiping tears away.

God bless these men and women who have given us so much.

PS- here’s a story the Greeley Tribune did on the award ceremony with links to the recipients personal stories:

~Katy~

 

Roadtrips and Nostalgia

I have been road-tripping since I was old enough to drive, many times criss-crossing the

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Stace, Mom, Me

country in cars that literally had no business being on the road.  Of course there were the family trips of the 70’s that we all remember.

I must have learned to travel on a serious budget from my mom. In 1974 my dad gave her 500$ -a princely sum in those days- to go from Sacramento, CA to Maine. 3200 miles with two kids and a grandma in our gas eating  Mercury Montego.  He told her if there was any money left over, she could stop in Reno on the way back and gamble. – Ohhh yeah! She gambled!

We stayed in Holiday Inns and HoJo’s every hojonight, got waited on three meals a day and saw every tourist attraction between here and there.

Try doing that today!

I collected many a placemat or coaster on our early trips. I think that’s what kept me dreaming about what’s over the next hill or around the next bend. I wish I had kept them all! But I DID remember and file away in the back of my mind, places on them that got my attention and visited them as I got older.

I wish cafe’s still used them. Such an amazing way to promote local tourism between towns and highlight things to buy/see/do. img_5169

I do have one travel mat… We had found cases of them in an old cafe we bought in Cope Colorado (yep- I’ve written about adventures in Cope before)

I find that while I enjoyed seeing the sights in the big cities- I still prefer the small communities along the way. The feeling of stepping back in time pulls at me. The people in these towns always have time to chat or answer questions- usually throwing some local lore or introducing me to other locals. And the hidden treasures to be found in the old Rexalls (we once bought a whole box of [outdated] Mercurochrome at one in North Dakota)  and variety stores can’t be matched!

This summer will be no different- a new trip through Cali, NV, UT, WY, SD, ND, ID, MT

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Around the bend

with my step mom- Not our first road trip together- I enjoy these trips with Grace because I get to add her “I remember these” stories to my memories giving me a different perspective to places I’ve in all probability already been.  I also love showcasing parts of the United States she never dreamed existed. That is half the fun!

They make a big deal of ‘multi-generational travel’ these days. It is anew buzz word. But really, most of us of a certain age grew up with it.

So- If you’ve got somewhere you think we should stop… let me know!

~Katy~

 

 

Aladdin, Wyoming ~ A Kate’s Eight

Every community, no matter its size has at least eight items it can build on.

Aladdin, Wyoming  is a favorite stop on our cutoff from Belle Fourche, SD to Sundance, aladdin10Wyoming whenever we’re headed to Colorado.  This micro-sized community packs a punch with everything from local foods and wine, cowboys and cattle, unique shopping and tourism.

Aladdin easily covers all eight assets- Arts/Culture, Architecture, Cuisine, Customs, History, Geography, People and Commerce

Everything fits into one of these categories. Every town, even ghost towns, have a story to tell about each one.”- Kansas Sampler Foundation

Here’s my take –

Geography – Aladdin is just to the east of the Bear Lodge Mountains and has k8scovered plateaus and pine and oak covered coulees and draws.  Stunning vistas no matter which direction a person looks. Aladdin also had an abundant coal seam, which was mined and sent to smelters near Deadwood.  *Bonus- there is an average of 226 sunny days a year!

Arts/Culture –  Brand new this year is the inaugural Aladdin Days Country Music and Food Festival on June 16th! (I can hardly wait, since it coincides perfectly with my next trip down!!) In the meantime, when visiting the mercantile there is local artwork – paintings, hand decorated skulls, notecards, etc- available and books from Wyoming authors. Right across from the store is the Centennial Park- with  picnic benches and toys for everyone to enjoy.

Architecture– The Aladdin Mercantile store was built in 1896 and IMG_3399 (1)is a prime example of early stores. This mercantile has been in continuous operation the entire time! The false front was a common feature during this time period.  Just a hop and a skip to the east of town is the Aladdin Tipple. Another prime example of early engineering and one of the last wooden tipples.

Cuisine–  Right next door to the mercantile is IMG_3403 (1)Cindy-B’s café and hotel. It doesn’t look like much from outside, but don’t let that fool you. The food is good, portions pretty generous and good prices. Not to mention you can sit on the patio and soak up the sun while you have morning coffee!chris wine

Inside the mercantile you will  find sandwiches, snacks and a small bar.  Local whiskeys and wines too! (Chris Ledoux, anybody???)

Customs–  Aladdin is in the heart of “Cowboy Country” and that means a certain set of rural values abound.  A mans word is his bond and handshake still means something.  Men will always treat women like ladies and friendliness is the order of the day.

History– (I could go on and on about local history, but I’ll keep it short!) Aladdin wasPhoto124462 founded in the late 1800s on coal and logging.  The Mercantile was opened in 1896.  The coal mined in Aladdin was loaded onto rail cars for use by gold smelters in Lead and Deadwood.  In 1874 Colonel Custer was in the Aladdin area during his Black Hills expedition.  Population peaked at 200 +/- during it’s coal mining years, but today hovers around 15.

aladdin8People– The people of Aladdin are a hearty bunch. Deeply committed to the land, their faith, community and country.  Always friendly and ready to help in a pinch. Many nearby residents are descendants of local settlers.  Want to know how the West really was?? Ask a local. They are usually very happy to share personal stories and local lore.

Visitors to Aladdin are equally as jolly. It’s a popular stop on the way to Devils Tower, Sturgis and for hunters and fishermen.

Commerce– The Aladdin Mercantile has it ALL- Literally.  It may be a one-man-band soaladdin5 to speak, but Wow! It carries artwork, clothing, antiques, foods and beverages, jewelry, gifts- truly, everything.  And make sure to send home a postcard from the little post office tucked inside and sit a spell on the porch.

The next time you’re road-tripping, make it a point to get off the road at Aladdin and enjoy the sights.  You won’t be disappointed!

“Kate’s 8” are a way of showcasing small towns and rural communities. When looking at your own town, get creative and see how many ways you can fit what you have into these categories and get creative with your marketing! 

~Katy~

*Katy is part of the dynamic speaking duo Tait and Kate- helping small towns and rural communities grow and thrive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural thoughts on raising the minimum wage

Many states have raised the minimum wage today. 18 in fact. Several of them to over $10 an hour.  Read about it here

Now don’t get me wrong- I don’t begrudge anybody a chance to make a decent living. I would have loved to be on the receiving end as a worker and as an employer would have been ecstatic to be able to pay my employees more.

3789566982_320590780eBut I do believe that these states did not really try to take their rural communities into account. In particular isolated rural communities.And if they did, it was only to spare a second to think to themselves ‘they don’t have enough people to matter’..

I’ve lived in several incredibly tiny rural communities in a couple of the states listed. We owned a business in one.  A little town of a hundred  people, 135 miles from the city (700K ppl), and 45 miles to the nearest ‘urban’ center (3500ppl) . Our nearest communities had 27 and 300 people respectively.  Those numbers have not fluctuated all that much in the years since we left.

Many rural businesses cannot sustain a fair sized increase in minimum wage. -Not even if it’s over a number of years.

I know many will say “Oh- What’s a buck or two?” – A couple dollars multiplied by 30 -40 hours a week adds up.  On top of that the employer will now pay a higher unemployment tax, FICA and workmans comp.  – all of which can hinder the ability to pay an employee a higher wage.

Those same dollars can also spell the difference between whether that rural community continues have a hardware store, market, café etc…

Here are some scenarios–  Bobs Hardware is a busy little place servicing several tiny communities. Bob needs help.- he hires Joe to come work and pays him the elevated wage. Joe is happy. For a time. -You see, Bob has to either sell more or cut Joes hours to afford the wage.

Bob can’t really sell any more than he already is because he doesn’t have the same traffic an urban or city business attracts. Bob is 145 miles from people. His customers are the farmers, ranchers and families in his area. And they can only buy so much.  So Bob cuts Joes hours.

Or.… Let’s say Bobs Hardware already has several employees. The minimum wage goes up. Bob has to choose. Does he cut everyone’s hours? Or does he let two go and keep Joe? And if he keeps Joe, is Joe going to up and quit because Bob expects him to work harder for the new wage?  Even if he pays a little more than the ‘new wage’- Joe may eventually build up resentment of having to do more work.

Or… Bobs Hardware employs Joe. The wages go up.  Bob can no longer afford to have even one employee. So Bob, who’s already run his rural business for decades l6939468522_bc879c5f3f_bet’s Joe go. Bob can no longer do all the work himself and cuts his business hours which in turn loses some revenue. Eventually Bob just throws in the towel and closes leaving communities without their only hardware store AND an empty/shuttered building on Main Street.  That in turn leads to lower property values for the entire community. And potentially lost revenue for the gas station, since the local farmer filled fuel on his way home from Bobs Hardware and grabbed a coffee at the cafe. In the meantime, Joe was let go and job opportunities in a town of a couple hundred are slim. Joe has moved to the city for work taking what disposable income he had with him, and quite possibly his kids out of school and money out of the donation plate at church that helped fund local causes or 4-h etc. 

Or… Bob raises his prices significantly in an effort to afford his wage increase and in the process actually loses business. – Many rural folk will save ‘it’ for a trip ‘to town’ when ‘it’ is no longer cost effective to buy locally. At the same time, when those folks go to town they will spend the entire day and do ALL their shopping and stop at the café to boot, bypassing their own community all together.

I have witnesses every one of these scenarios over the years.

**99% of small business owners in rural communities WANT to pay their employees better. They genuinely love their towns and the people within and want them to survive and thrive.

**A huge number of those same employers work tremendous amounts of hours themselves “FOR FREE” so they CAN employ someone from the area. (we did)

**Sometimes in lieu of money they find other creative compensation.  We did.  If we hadn’t we wouldn’t have been  able to be open enough hours to even pay ourselves a meager living.

So while I don’t necessarily think the new wages are bad, I do think they will force some hard decisions in rural communities.

In equal numbers, some businesses will find a way and some will not. Some will close. Some will hang on- for a while, maybe longer. Some will thrive.

Next time we’ll talk about some of the creative ways we’ve seen businesses in tiny communities thrive.

~Katy~

Katy is a rural and small town consultant with Tait and Kate Consulting  ~Helping rural communities grow and thrive~

 

 

Trunk or Treat and the demise of neighborhoods

Trunk or Treat is really catching on.  This is where folks line their cars up, decorate the trunks and the little people walk around on Halloween getting their candy in one place. One street. One part of one street.17544

Now I’m not against the concept. I see it’s merits is places like San Francisco, New York City and the like, where many folks may live in high rises or such. I can also see how it makes parents feel safer if they live in a ‘bad part of town’. Or the ease of just stopping in the parking lot at your kids school. And very micro towns- this may be a good way for everyone to get together in the evening.

But mostly I see it as the nail on the coffin, so to speak, for neighborhoods.

I just caught a local interview on the news and the young mother said she is glad it is in the school parking lot because she “recognizes other parents and children”. To me that implies that while she recognizes them, she doesn’t know  them.  It also implies that there is no value to her in knowing the neighbors on any level.

james halloween 001I am old enough to remember when everyone went door to door. Parents visited with each other on sidewalks as we ran up to “trick or treat”- Parents also made it a point to introduce themselves any new or unknown neighbors, as well as inviting them to upcoming neighborhood events and shindigs.

My own kids went house to house.  We went back and forth between country and city living- so some years we drove the kids into ‘town’ (we were 3 miles from the nearest neighbor and 16 to town) so they could go with their school chums… all of a hundred folks lived ‘in town’.

Last year I was giving a talk on community involvement in a local small town, right before Halloween. The City Auditor stated she was taking her children the next town over for trunk or treat. Why? Because there were new neighbors on the corner she didn’t know and was afraid to let her kids go up by themselves. So- my first question back was WHY haven’t you already introduced yourself? followed by Why not go up with them???  She chose to take her children 12 miles away to the town with under a hundred people from her own with nearly 500- It kinda baffles me.

Way to go- making your new community member feel unwelcome right out of the gate.  

In a rural or small town setting Trunk or Treat also takes away from the joy of the home bound who have prepared for days for little ghosts and goblins and princesses and unicorns to come to their door. Many of the older folks know every family around, whose kids have allergies, whose like nut rolls and whose love candy corn and make individual bags for them. I know Mildred (in her 90s)  would have been desolate if the kids hadn’t made an appearance- She’d been known for decades in the neighborhood.

Imagine how you would feel if you went all out, quite possibly hoarding bits of your fixed income so you could have treats for the kiddies, to have no one show up. That would probably be disheartening. And what of the new family? Don’t you think that attitude by your new town would keep  person or family  from participating in  other ‘community’ things during the year?

Trick or Treating is almost a rite of passage. It is tradition. It is neighbors being neighborly. – (And trying to out do each other!)

It is community.

It’s OK to do both- To Trunk or Treat at a location, but try  to be neighborly too. You don’t have to cover blocks… but it would be nice to knock on your neighbors door and say “Trick or Treat” or “Welcome to the neighborhood”

-Katy-

Sensible shoes and memories

We went to a good Eye-Tali-an-o wedding last week down in Denver.

All the players were there… “The Don” ,”Cha-Cha”  the wise guys and all the rest. Polyester in abundance right along with chest hair and chains, big hair and high heels.

But what stood out the most, was The Don’s mother-in-law…. In her sensible shoes.sensibleshoes

I was immediately reminded of all the old ladies that used to sit on their stoops and watch kids play in the street. She reminded me of MY grandmother. Never without her sensible shoes.  And all the times she chatted with ‘The Ladies” – Comparing olive oils and pedigrees, transgressions and recipes, children and husbands and so on. All dressed alike- all in sensible shoes.

She reminded me of all the ladies riding the bus to the market in San Francisco- shopping bags tucked neatly into handbags or under their arms, housedresses and sensible shoes for walking.  She reminded me of  garlic and gravy (that’s-a what we call spago sauce) and crusty bread and cannoli.

it ladiesShe reminded me of when we lived in North Carolina and went to a Columbus Day Celebration in downtown Fayetteville.

There standing all her glory on street corner was an elderly Italian lady in her green (the EXACT same shade as the flag!) housedress, matching handbag and jaunty little hat  proudly holding a full size Italian Flag waving gently in the wind. In her sensible shoes….

A toast to The Don’s mother-in-law!

Salute!

I miss my Grammy and was happy for the memories

~Katy~

 

 

Big Rigs are Big Boy (& Girl) Toys

This fall my husbands business  was a sponsor of  the Hammer Down Big Rig Truckimg_7883 Show in Mandan, North Dakota.

What started as a get together of friends to  tell tall tales and do ‘burn outs’ in the shop parking lot, morphed into this brand new annual event. A neat fact- All grass roots! There were no major sponsors- just all the ‘guys’ pitching in.

It was beautiful fall day for ND- 90 degrees! And far img_7871more trucks than expected showed up! By the end of the week it was announced they had 75 committed and ended up with just under 100.

~ I personally think they came for the Truck Races~   that’s right.. These folks took their Big Rigs on the dirt circle track and went for it…

Can you hear the song in your head???

It was a dark of the moon… on the sixth of June …and a Kenworth pulling logs… cab over Pete… 14322306_1078795705535236_8587227473011778332_nwith a refer on…and a Jimmy haulin’ hogs… we was headed for bear on I-1-0…about a mile outta Shakey Town…I says Pig Pen, this here’s the Rubber Duck… and I’m about to put the hammer down.       ~Convoy~ by CW McCall             

This turned out to be a great event! Young and old alike had a 14370382_1082207555194051_5035067683291304675_ngreat time reminiscing about “way back when I was hauling…” and telling tall tales about close calls and impossible feats.

 

Lessons?  Of course there lessons… Never underestimate your audience and Always be prepared for anything.

See ya there next year!

~Katy~

 

 

 

 

What does your entryway say about you?

An entryway says so much about a building. It is space that is often overlooked, but sets the tone for what is ahead.

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Urban Indigo    Oakland, CA

What does yours say about you? It can tell us what type of business is in there. If it  is open or closed.

Is yours welcoming?  Does it tell a story? Spark the imagination? Tempt you?

An entryway can also be art. It can be so many things!

In Berthoud, Colorado a joint effort between the city, 11261827_1529547420689260_6503898361766391575_obusinesses and homeowners produced Entryways of Berthoud to showcase art and their community. They invited folks to submit photos of entryways and these were then turned into notecards and posters.

An entryway for a business has many functions and is an important part of the establishment itself.  It may act as the local bulletin board in a rural community, or set the tone of the business.

An entryway can provide a striking entrance with uses of color and architectural details. Or lead into a more formal atmosphere with more subdued touches.

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Chop & Wok Scottsdale, AZ

 

Similar to the beginning a chapter in a book, an entryway establishes a story that has yet to unfold.

An entryway is also a very affordable way to change a businesses dynamic.  It is a spot where risks can be taken, and even on a limited budget, have a remarkable effect.

img_8317Think about the places you frequent. How do they make you feel? Welcome? Not so much?

We like our homes to be welcoming and inviting. Our businesses should be too.

How can you use your entryway to enhance your business or community?

~Katy~

Katy is a rural and small town /small business speaker, consultant, advocate & writer.  She believes many small communities can grow from within using resources already at hand and creative strategies and leverage those to attract new families, businesses and customers.  Do you want Tait & Kate to come speak to your community or group? Email us at info@taitandkate.com

 

 

 

 

 

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