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Aladdin, Wyoming ~ A Kate’s Eight

Every community, no matter its size has at least eight items it can build on.

Aladdin, Wyoming  is a favorite stop on our cutoff from Belle Fourche, SD to Sundance, aladdin10Wyoming whenever we’re headed to Colorado.  This micro-sized community packs a punch with everything from local foods and wine, cowboys and cattle, unique shopping and tourism.

Aladdin easily covers all eight assets- Arts/Culture, Architecture, Cuisine, Customs, History, Geography, People and Commerce

Everything fits into one of these categories. Every town, even ghost towns, have a story to tell about each one.”- Kansas Sampler Foundation

Here’s my take –

Geography – Aladdin is just to the east of the Bear Lodge Mountains and has k8scovered plateaus and pine and oak covered coulees and draws.  Stunning vistas no matter which direction a person looks. Aladdin also had an abundant coal seam, which was mined and sent to smelters near Deadwood.  *Bonus- there is an average of 226 sunny days a year!

Arts/Culture –  Brand new this year is the inaugural Aladdin Days Country Music and Food Festival on June 16th! (I can hardly wait, since it coincides perfectly with my next trip down!!) In the meantime, when visiting the mercantile there is local artwork – paintings, hand decorated skulls, notecards, etc- available and books from Wyoming authors. Right across from the store is the Centennial Park- with  picnic benches and toys for everyone to enjoy.

Architecture– The Aladdin Mercantile store was built in 1896 and IMG_3399 (1)is a prime example of early stores. This mercantile has been in continuous operation the entire time! The false front was a common feature during this time period.  Just a hop and a skip to the east of town is the Aladdin Tipple. Another prime example of early engineering and one of the last wooden tipples.

Cuisine–  Right next door to the mercantile is IMG_3403 (1)Cindy-B’s café and hotel. It doesn’t look like much from outside, but don’t let that fool you. The food is good, portions pretty generous and good prices. Not to mention you can sit on the patio and soak up the sun while you have morning coffee!chris wine

Inside the mercantile you will  find sandwiches, snacks and a small bar.  Local whiskeys and wines too! (Chris Ledoux, anybody???)

Customs–  Aladdin is in the heart of “Cowboy Country” and that means a certain set of rural values abound.  A mans word is his bond and handshake still means something.  Men will always treat women like ladies and friendliness is the order of the day.

History– (I could go on and on about local history, but I’ll keep it short!) Aladdin wasPhoto124462 founded in the late 1800s on coal and logging.  The Mercantile was opened in 1896.  The coal mined in Aladdin was loaded onto rail cars for use by gold smelters in Lead and Deadwood.  In 1874 Colonel Custer was in the Aladdin area during his Black Hills expedition.  Population peaked at 200 +/- during it’s coal mining years, but today hovers around 15.

aladdin8People– The people of Aladdin are a hearty bunch. Deeply committed to the land, their faith, community and country.  Always friendly and ready to help in a pinch. Many nearby residents are descendants of local settlers.  Want to know how the West really was?? Ask a local. They are usually very happy to share personal stories and local lore.

Visitors to Aladdin are equally as jolly. It’s a popular stop on the way to Devils Tower, Sturgis and for hunters and fishermen.

Commerce– The Aladdin Mercantile has it ALL- Literally.  It may be a one-man-band soaladdin5 to speak, but Wow! It carries artwork, clothing, antiques, foods and beverages, jewelry, gifts- truly, everything.  And make sure to send home a postcard from the little post office tucked inside and sit a spell on the porch.

The next time you’re road-tripping, make it a point to get off the road at Aladdin and enjoy the sights.  You won’t be disappointed!

“Kate’s 8” are a way of showcasing small towns and rural communities. When looking at your own town, get creative and see how many ways you can fit what you have into these categories and get creative with your marketing! 

~Katy~

*Katy is part of the dynamic speaking duo Tait and Kate- helping small towns and rural communities grow and thrive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Masonville, Colorado- A Kate’s 8 town

MasonvilleColorado~ a beautiful, picturesque little (un-incorporated) micro sized, 20140626_133444unincorporated town (wide spot in the road)  has all eight of the assets that every community shares. The fact that there really in no ‘town’ per-se, is not a problem.  A skip away from Estes Park, Loveland and Ft Collins– it is still a slice of the wild west and feels like it is miles and miles from anywhere. (which it kinda is- ank8s average of 30 miles to ‘anywhere’)

Masonville easily covers all the assets:  Architecture, Art/Culture, Cuisine, Customs, Commerce, Geography, History and People.

Every things fits into one of these categories, and every town- even a ghost town- has a story to tell about each one” – Kansas Sample Foundation

Here’s my ‘story’ on each element;

Geography– Masonville was originally platted in the Buckhorn Canyon following a  small discovery of Gold.  It is surrounded by the stunning foothills and rolling meadows leading up to Estes Park and the Buckhorn, Redstone and Big Thompson creeks. It is an area considered to be part of the beginning of the “Front Range”.  Gold, Silver, Tungsten, Copper and Nickel have been found there along with a host of other lesser ores and small gemstones.

The winding roads leading into Masonville make it a popular destination for motorcyclists and bicyclists alike.

20140626_133558Art/Culture  A part of Masonville holds a mini western ‘town’ and many sculptures and 20140626_134359paintings.  In part they tell a story about the West that Was and in part just for whimsy.

Commerce  For a town with only TWO businesses, it sure is a busy place!!! The  Masonville Mercantile  is an incredible little year round Emporium that serves many markets- everything from unique gifts to the wedding and historical re-enactment markets. Their milliner even

derby hats

photo by M. Vendegna

makes award winning hats for the ladies at the Kentucky Derby.  The Nostalgic West Leather Shop is a ‘go to’ shopping hot spot for all things leather. Dusters, cowboy hats, quality bike leathers (we have some from there!) gloves, gifts and accessories.

 

Cuisine – While there are no traditional food places to eat at in Masonville,  each year there are a number of events from farmers markets to BBQ’s that draw huge crowds. – A great way to meet new people and enjoy the beauty of the area. (and there’s always the snacks at the Mercantile!)

People – Many of the local residents of the Masonville area have roots that run very deep.  Members of the Milnor family has been in the area since the late 1800s. bikes masonville

Each year tourists from all over the world visit Masonville too. I have met people from England, Scotland and Australia while hanging out in Masonville!

Architecture – The Mercantile and the Hotel (now privately owned) were originally built closer to Buckhorn creek, but later moved to where they currently are. The store has been added onto over the years. But the authenticity of the wild west remains. Across from the store, is a small outdoor chapel and ‘wild west town’. Much of it was built with reclaimed lumber from original buildings to the area.   Read here for some history on the Masonville store.  Down the street, the old school is still there and has been turned into a private residence, as has the hotel.

History- Named for James R Mason, Masonville itself  was originally platted in the 1890’s, masonville-school3though there were already families living in the area at that time.  The Kitchens, Milner’s and Sheldon’s to name but a few. – The local history is rich with stories of cattle rustlers and mountain men, pioneers and tourists.  And the life story of Cal Carter, Masonville’s last goldcal-carter-mine1 miner is quite extraordinary.

Customs- Where to start?? Many years ago the mercantile hosted the Masonville Mercantile Ball at the holidays.  I am not sure if they still do, as we have been gone from the area a few years now and I have only been back in the summers.

But I do know that Masonville plays host to a number of Steam Punk, Wedding, SASS, bike runs, Sunday-go-to-meeting, BBQs, Farmers markets and more.

These are a continuance of the customs from olden days when people congregated at the local store for fellowship, to hear the news and get entertainment.

Stay tuned for more Kate’s 8 towns!

~Katy~

Katy is a speaker for  rural and small communities and small business as well as a columnist for AgWeek.   www.taitandkate.com for more information

 

What does your entryway say about you?

An entryway says so much about a building. It is space that is often overlooked, but sets the tone for what is ahead.

mercat_window_2015

Urban Indigo    Oakland, CA

What does yours say about you? It can tell us what type of business is in there. If it  is open or closed.

Is yours welcoming?  Does it tell a story? Spark the imagination? Tempt you?

An entryway can also be art. It can be so many things!

In Berthoud, Colorado a joint effort between the city, 11261827_1529547420689260_6503898361766391575_obusinesses and homeowners produced Entryways of Berthoud to showcase art and their community. They invited folks to submit photos of entryways and these were then turned into notecards and posters.

An entryway for a business has many functions and is an important part of the establishment itself.  It may act as the local bulletin board in a rural community, or set the tone of the business.

An entryway can provide a striking entrance with uses of color and architectural details. Or lead into a more formal atmosphere with more subdued touches.

dscn2265

Chop & Wok Scottsdale, AZ

 

Similar to the beginning a chapter in a book, an entryway establishes a story that has yet to unfold.

An entryway is also a very affordable way to change a businesses dynamic.  It is a spot where risks can be taken, and even on a limited budget, have a remarkable effect.

img_8317Think about the places you frequent. How do they make you feel? Welcome? Not so much?

We like our homes to be welcoming and inviting. Our businesses should be too.

How can you use your entryway to enhance your business or community?

~Katy~

Katy is a rural and small town /small business speaker, consultant, advocate & writer.  She believes many small communities can grow from within using resources already at hand and creative strategies and leverage those to attract new families, businesses and customers.  Do you want Tait & Kate to come speak to your community or group? Email us at info@taitandkate.com

 

 

 

 

 

The heartbeat of a community

 

historic-downtonw-lincoln-magnifying-glass_0I just came back from a whirlwind trip through parts of California. Most of my jaunts out there are like that.(I grew up there)  Have to squeeze them in between calves and crops, you know!

While I was there I treated myself to a morning stop in Lincoln. This gem is +/- about 30 miles North East of Sacramento on Hwy 65.

“Downtown is the heartbeat of a community”

At the turn of the 1900’s Lincoln was a “boom town”.  I would imagine it began it’s decline in the 1970’s or so.  Back in the 80’s I bought my horse hay at

header

I used to buy hay in this beautifully revamped building!

the feed store on the corner and the standing joke was that Lincoln had to “borrow” its Saturday night police from Marysville.

Over the years Lincoln has grown. And grown. And Grown.  OUTSIDE of the city border. Downtown became sadly neglected. Building were run down. Store fronts empty.

About a dozen years ago the good people of Lincoln- many of them “old timers” came together to revitalize the old section.  Building were revamped, they enticed people to come and see the possibilities and did some creative wheeling and dealing to get the storefronts filled.  Here’s a great video on it:

Several years ago a friend of mine asked if I had been to Lincoln lately, and I said Not in years, nuthin’ there!  So she cheerfully informed that there was indeed plenty there.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Everything from food and antiques to a fab quilt shop. -All things to pique my interest.

I found much to like and did some shopping 🙂 much to hubby chagrin.

Fast forward another few years. This trip I had time to spend the entire morning and early afternoon.  So, my morning was spentimg_7938 having coffee with my son at a sidewalk café and walking all over Old Town. We had a wonderful time exploring and visiting with shop owners! Everybody was so friendly and helpful. Our only bummer was that we were there before the museum opened, and by the time it was, we were already around the corner at Kim’s Café having late ‘brunch’ (an outstanding café with heaping plates of down home cookin’.)with other family in the area.

Lincoln boasts a number of eateries, antique stores, boutiques, thrift shops, wineries, brewpubs, gardening/gift shops and more.  It is quite the bustling area, offering something for everybody.  Even my son was practically giddy when he found a shop that interested him.

Nearly every single store has outdoor seating and all have wonderful signage designed to attract attention. Several of the buildings have beautiful murals on them. Even the lone ‘box’ store is in keeping with the Old Town vibe.

~ The seating is amazing. Just by sitting down outside the coffee shop, people TALKED as they went by! And when People talk, Community happens.~

img_7935“Honoring the past while embracing the future”

Lincoln also hosts many events to draw people and have a good times- Everything from antique car shows to food truck extravaganzas and in between.

When you’re not busy eating, visiting or shopping in one of the great shops, take a little time and drive around the ‘heart’ of Lincoln and its neighborhoods.  The architecture in amazing.

A stop in at the Lincoln Area Chamber was on my way around town and I had a wonderful visit with Tom Cosgrove, Chamber director. We had a few minutes to chat about the creativity involved with attracting businesses back to Downtown, and how rosy the future looks.

Rebuilding Lincoln wasn’t (and still isn’t) all sunshine and rainbows. It took loads of grit, outside the box creative thinking, vision , dreams, browbeating and hope.

Success feeds on success. Each small step lead to the next one and each one was progressively better and bigger. The energy in this beautiful town is incredible.

I will definitely be back again. Hopefully sooner rather than later!

Art, Architecture, Geography, Commerce, People, History, Customs and Cuisine– Yep! Covered ALL of “Kate’s 8” items that all communities begin with.

~Katy~

Katy is part of Tait&Kate– rural and small community speaker and advocate. TaitandKate can help your community fill your empty store fronts with outside the box strategies and build community from the inside out.  

Want to book us for your next meeting or conference? email us at  info@taitandkate.com

 

K-8, K-eight, Kate, Kate the Great

Okay- it’s really more like the Kansas Sampler, but that doesn’t have the same ring as ‘Kate the Great’ does it?  logo

  “Kate’s 8” will actually  be a regular feature on the towns I visit and what I see as their “8”

According to the Kansas Sampler Foundation, there are eight things every community has. No matter their size, large or small, they can all drum up their eight with a little creativity.

Once you identify your eight, begin building on them and see how many ways you get people to come to your town!

The eight are:

Art, Architecture, Geography, Commerce, People, History, Customs & Cuisine

IMG_7363How do YOU define each in your community??  Is your Art murals? Is it sculpture? Is it the garden layed out in the design of the Queen of England? -Use your imagination

Even if it’s only the Avon lady… it’s still commerce! And it counts. It’s a start. And obviously somebody believes.

What is your history? Do you have a museum? The only stone jail in the state? When was your community settled? A long tradition of ‘old school’ music?   100_0219Find your own version of history and use it.

Cuisine is everything from Sunday church picnics to that fabulous smoked ham the neighbor makes. Maybe someone makes the best pies this side of the Mississippi. Maybe you have the BBQ joint.

People are everyone. You have people. That’s a start!   Tell stories about them. Celebrate376935_3912363420016_771502863_n them!

Customs can be anything from the yearly Church Social to the community Christmas Tree. It can be past customs. (that way it can also double up as history) Did your town used to have something? Do you celebrate Ukrainian Easter or other ethnic holidays? What do you have?

Architecture– I love architecture. All Kinds! Old buildings (especially with vintage or art deco designs or signs… Oh, hey! That’s also Art!! Bonus!) , 2014-05-18 11.20.40new buildings, churches, schools, barns, out houses etc… What do YOU have?

IMG_6944Geography is  everything from the sweeping vistas of the prairies to the woodlands and in between.  Every place has geography. Rivers, lakes, mountains and so on.

So, go on! Be creative. Involve everyone. Ask around. You’ll be amazed at how differently each person views ‘the eight’

“Kate’s 8”  will be ongoing features of the “K-8” that I find in the towns I visit.

What’s in your town?

~Katy~

Need a speaker? Call us! We give talks on rural and small communities and business and how they can grow using just what is at hand as well as showcasing fabulous ideas that other towns have embraced and turned into huge wins.  www.taitandkate.com  We can also show you ways to get the C.A.V.E (citizens against virtually everything) people on board too.

 

 

 

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